Food – about vegan food.

Going vegan is derived only from plant based foods. Vegans do not use or consume any animals or animal products including flesh (land or sea animals), milk, eggs, or honey.

Eating vegan doesn’t require breaking the bank or moving to a big city. The most nutritious and inexpensive vegan foods which can be found in any supermarket, are fresh produce, grains, legumes and nuts/seeds. These should make up the bulk of the diet for optimum health. Vegan processed foods in the form of soy hot dogs, vegan &”cheeses,” desserts, etc are best eaten only on occasion. The following information will help you ease into going vegan with so much more confidence.

Isn’t vegan food boring?

A popular myth is that vegans subsist only on soybeans and salad. In reality, vegans eat everything non-vegans eat, but without the animal products and likely with more variety from special foods.

Common vegan dishes include stir fry, pasta, rice and beans, chana masala, cucumber-avocado sushi, pad thai, quinoa, pizza, pancakes, French toast, waffles, veggie burgers, chili, soups, tacos, burritos, casseroles, stew, sandwiches, cookies, non-dairy ice-cream and other delicious frozen vegan confectionaries, cakes, pies, etc.

Nutrition & Health

Nutritional deficiencies are a concern for everyone. While vegans statistically enjoy longer life spans than the average human being, we are not exempt from this reality. First and foremost, you should ensure you are receiving enough Vitamin B-12, Omega-3, and Vitamin D. See below for more detailed information on vegan nutrition.

Protein: Because animal-based foods are high in protein, it’s a common misconception that vegans don’t get enough of it. In fact, the real problem is nonvegans getting too much protein. Vegans can get all the protein they need from lentils, tempeh, tofu, beans, nuts, seeds, and even vegetables.

We highly recommend the book, Becoming Vegan by Brenda Davis and Vesanto Melina. M.S., R.D for more detailed information pertaining to ones age and individual needs. They provide sample menu plans and nutrition recommendations for children, teenagers, pregnancy, and athletes as well as a wealth of information on proper nutrition. Also, be sure to check out The Boston Vegan Association’s Nutritional Pamphlet

Calcium: (Approximately 1000 milligrams per day, 1200 milligrams for women over 51 and men over 70.) Leafy green vegetables-kale, collards, broccoli, okra, figs, oranges, almonds, pistachio nuts, hazelnuts, flaxseed, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, soybeans, chickpeas, navy beans, pinto beans, kidney beans, lentils, tempeh, tofu*, fortified non-dairy yogurt, fortified non-dairy milks, fortified soy products, fortified breakfast cereals, and fortified orange juice. Note: Spinach, beet greens, and chard are healthy foods but not good sources of calcium.

When purchasing tofu, look for the calcium-set tofu with “calcium sulphate” in the ingredients.

Iron: Chickpeas (hummus), lentils, navy beans, pinto beans, kidney beans, soybeans, quinoa, tofu, raisins, goji berries, fortified veggie burgers and other soy products, pumpkin seeds, cashews, figs, sunflower seeds, sesame tahini, prunes, whole wheat, parsley, and pine nuts.

Tips

Vitamin-C rich foods help with iron absorption. Try eating these foods in the same meal. Use cast-iron cookware. If your iron status is low, avoid consuming foods high in zinc at the same meal.

B12: (2000 micrograms once a week or 10-100 micrograms a day.) Produced by bacteria and found in soil, water, etc, it is necessary for vegans to supplement their diet since most vegetables are cleaned very well. Vegans supplement their diets with B12 by eating nutritional yeast or fortified foods. Most non-dairy milks and cereals are fortified with B12. Consume at least three servings of vitamin B12-fortified food per day (each supplying at least 20% of the Daily Value on the label), Or, vegan B12 tablets, or slow release B12 patches are also available today. Very often nonvegans suffer from B12 deficiency – deficiencies can affect anyone who follows a poor diet following only processes fast foods etc.  (One 2000 mcg tablet (ideally chewed or dissolved under your tongue) once a week; or at least 10-100 mcg once a day.)Buy Nutritional Yeast Buy Vitamin B12 Tablets

Omega-3: Two tablespoons of ground flax seeds every day or two teaspoons daily of flax seed oil. And/or, an omega 3 DHA supplement in the form of algae.

 

Vitamin D: Light skin-about 10-15 minutes of sunshine. Dark skin: about 30 minutes of sunshine daily depending on the time of year, etc. Buy vegan Vitamin D3 Note: Vitamin D3 found in many fortified orange juices comes from the wool of sheep and is not vegan.

The information here is intended as a helpful overview but cannot cover all vegan nutrition topics. To make sure that your diet is meeting all the nutrients that your body and mind need, please consult a nutrition professional with expertise in vegan diets should you feel the need, preferably consult a vegan physician – one who has extensive knowledge on healthy vegan foods. Also it is preferable to obtain nutrients from a healthy well balanced vegan diet to those of pills where possible. When going vegan it is very likely that your health will improve whilst doing it correctly.

Special Foods

Spend some time with a vegan and you may be surprised to learn a vegan’s diet is not just the standard diet minus animal products. There are several kinds of foods which have gained recognition as vegan staples.

Tempeh

Tempeh (“tem-pea” or “tem-pay”) is like tofu, but fermented and pressed to be thick and savoury. An easy way to prepare tempeh is to fry or grill with blended seasonings meant for grilling. Check your ingredients, of course, but surprisingly many are vegan.

 

Tofu

Tofu is a solid food made from pressed soybean curd. It’s one of the most unusual vegan staples in that it can be used to make a breakfast dish like  scrambled tofu, a dinner dish like pan fried tofu, or even a chocolate mousse dessert. Tofu gets a bad wrap in popular culture as a tasteless food, but tofu isn’t meant to be a flavour agent. It works best at soaking up flavours and giving them a texture and consistency.

Seitan

Seitan is a chewy and naturally brown substance made from wheat gluten, an isolated protein found in wheat. Seitan is usually cut into strips and baked or fried to provide some protein and chewiness to a dish.

Like tempeh, seitan is very easy to prepare and needs little to no seasoning.

Nutritional Yeast

Nutritional yeast is very different from the yeast used in bread. Nutritional yeast, which comes powdered or in flakes, is most often used to provide a cheesy consistency. Unlike cheese, nutritional yeast also lasts far longer and has no cholesterol. Sprinkle in soup, on popcorn, or add water to make cheesy sauces.

Red Star Nutritional Yeast

Ingredients

The number of nonvegan ingredients found in food and products is too numerous to mention here, but we’ve included some of the most common below.

Common Nonvegan Ingredients

  • Casein
    Casein is a protein from milk. Surprisingly, can often found in soy cheeses –  so beware!
  • Carmine/Carminic Acid
    Also known as Crimson Lake, Cochineal, Natural Red 4, C.I. 75470, or E120, carmine is made from crushed cochineal insects with bright red shells. Often used as a red food coloring.
  • Beeswax
    Beeswax, as the name implies comes from honeybees. Why isn’t honey/beeswax vegan?
  • Gelatin
    Gelatin is a substance produced from the collagen found in animal bones and hoofs. This is often used for marshmallows, Jello®, and as a preservative.
  • Vitamin D3
    Often found in fortified orange juice, vitamin D3 comes from Lanolin, a sheep product. D2, however, is vegan.
  • Whey
    Whey is a milk protein often used as a protein boost in some commercial foods.

Replacements

Here are some quick tips for using vegan ingredients to replace the animal products in your favourite recipes

Eggs

  • Apple Sauce
    Applesauce will give off a gas while being cooked, making your baked goods fluffy. It’s also doesn’t require adding as much liquid as powdered replacers. 1/4 cup applesauce = 1 egg
  • Ground Flax Seed
    When ground to a powder and liquified with water, ground flax seed creates a gooey texture great for binding. It’s also full of protein and omega-3s. 1 tbsp ground flax + 3 tbsp water = 1 egg.
  • Banana
    Like applesauce, bananas are naturally sweet. They also have strong binding properties when used baked goods. 1/2 banana = 1 egg
  • Baking soda/powder
    When you really need your dish fluffy without extra flavor, simple baking soda or baking powder does wonders. 1 tsp baking powder + 1 1/2 tbs water + 1 1/2 tbs oil or 1 tbs vinegar + 1 tsp baking soda = 1 egg.
More wonderful egg substitutes can be found here (egg replacements)

Milk

  • Soy/Oat/Hemp/Almond/etc. milk
    By now, you’ve probably heard of the increasingly popular nut- and bean-derived milk products making their way into grocery stores. While soymilk is probably the most prevalent, some prefer rice milk for its naturally light and sweet flavour and almond milk for a boost of Vitamin E, monounsaturated fats, dietary fiber, and B vitamins.

More about milk replacements here (milk replacements)

  • Vegetable Oil
    The only difference between a fat and an oil is that a fat is a solid at room temperature. Often when milk is used in foods like mashed potatoes, it’s the fat that makes it creamy. Substituting this for vegetable or olive oil is equally as satisfying and much healthier.

Check out some ideas for a healthy vegan pantry here (vegan pantry to help get you started)

Food Blogs

Cookbooks

The New American Vegan by Vincent J. Guihan

Weaving together personal stories with 120 appetizing recipes, this friendly cookbook delivers authentically American and vegan cuisine that has to be tasted to be believed. Midwestern-inspired recipes range from very basic to the modestly complicated, but always with an eye on creating something beautiful and delicious in its simplicity.

Clear text provides step-by-step instructions and helps new cooks find their feet in a vegan kitchen, with a whole chapter devoted to terms, tools, and techniques. With an eye towards improvisation, the cookbook provides a detailed basic recipe that is good as-is, while providing additional notes that explain how to take each recipe further—to increase flavor, to add drama to the presentation, or just to add extra flourish.”

Vegan Yum Yum by Lauren Ulm

“When Lauren Ulm went vegan, she faced the typical onslaught of questions from acquaintances and more than the occasional wince from unsuspecting dinner guests. Vowing to prove that vegan food can be decadent and delicious—and not a bland stand-in for ‘normal’ food—she created a blog, veganyumyum.com. What began as a hobby became an obsession….

Here in her debut cookbook, Lauren shows that vegan food is anything but dull, with her creative and quirky twists on everything from crowd-pleasing appetizers to indulgent desserts, from easy weekend breakfasts to speedy weeknight dinners, plus holiday- and company-worthy fare you can serve with pride.”

The Vegan Table by Colleen Patrick-Goudreau

“A celebration of plant-based cuisine, The Vegan Table offers recipes and menus for every occasion and season, including romantic meals, traditional tea parties, formal dinners, casual gatherings, children’s parties, and holiday feasts.

Packed with invaluable tips, expert advice, fascinating lore, delicious recipes, and gorgeous full-color photographs, The Vegan Table is the ultimate guide, whether you are hosting an intimate gathering of close friends or a large party with an open guest list.

Organized by themed menus, the eclectic mix of recipes features cuisines from around the world, including Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, Mexican, Asian, Indian, and African. Follow the menus provided, or create your own using the array of appetizers, soups, stews, salads, main dishes, and desserts.”

Let them Eat Vegan by Dreena Burton

“Vegan food has come a long way in the past decade. The once ubiquitous dry, packaged veggie burger is no longer the poster child for an animal-free diet.

It has evolved into a creative, sophisticated cuisine touted by the likes of Food & Wine magazine. Long at the fore of vegan blogging and cooking, Dreena Burton has been known for making healthy taste delicious. Let Them Eat Vegan! distills more than fifteen years of recipe development that emphasize unrefined, less-processed ingredients–no white flour or white sugar, but instead whole-grain flours, natural sweeteners, raw foods, and plenty of beans ’n greens.

There’s no relying on meat analogues here, either–just hearty, healthy food that looks and tastes great. As the mother of three young girls, Burton always keeps their nutrition–and taste buds–in mind. From the simplest comfort foods like Warm ‘Vegveeta’ Cheese Sauce to the more sophisticated Anise-and Coriander-Infused Orange Lentil Soup, these recipes will delight and inspire even the pickiest eaters and provide lifelong vegans with the innovative, wholesome recipes they’ve always wanted.”

The 30 Minute Vegan by Mark Reinfeld and Jennifer Murray

“Busy vegans, rejoice! award-winning husband and wife chefs/authors Reinfeld and Murray present 150 delicious, easy-to prepare recipes for everyday vegan cooking—all dishes that can be prepared in a half-hour.

Sections include The Lighter Side of Life: Smoothies & Satiating Beverages; Snacks, Pick Me Ups & Kids’ Favorites; Lunches: Wraps, Rolls, Bowls, and More; Extraordinary Salads; Sumptuous Soups; Small Plates: Appetizers, Side Dishes, Light Dinners; Wholesome Suppers; Guilt-Free Comfort Food: Healthy Translations of Old Stand-bys; and Divine Desserts.

The 30-Minute Vegan also provides at-a-glance cooking charts, kids’ favorite dishes, and exciting menu suggestions for every occasion—making this an essential cookbook for busy vegans who want to enjoy delicious, healthful, whole-foods vegan fare every day.”

Desserts

The Joy of Vegan Baking by Colleen Patrick-Goudreau

“A seasoned cooking instructor and self-described “joyful vegan,” author Colleen Patrick-Goudreau puts to rest the myth that vegan baking is an inferior alternative to non-vegan baking, putting it in its rightful place as a legitimate contender in the baking arena.

More than just a collection of recipes, this informative cookbook is a valuable resource for any baker — novice or seasoned. Learn just how easy it is to enjoy your favorite homespun goodies without compromising your health or values.”

Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World by Isa Chandra Moskowitz and Terry Hope Romero

The hosts of the vegan cooking show The Post Punk Kitchen are back with a vengeance — and this time, dessert.

A companion volume to Vegan with a Vengeance, Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World is a sweet and sassy guide to baking everyone’s favorite treat without using any animal products. This unique cookbook contains over 50 recipes for cupcakes and frostings — some innovative, some classics — with beautiful full color photographs. Isa and Terry offer delicious, cheap, dairy-free, egg-free and vegan-friendly recipes like Classic Vanilla Cupcakes (with chocolate frosting), Crimson Velveteen Cupcakes (red velvet with creamy white frosting), Linzer Torte Cupcakes (hazelnut with raspberry and chocolate ganache), Chai Latte Cupcakes (with powdered sugar) and Banana Split Cupcakes (banana-chocolate chip-pineapple with fluffy frosting). Included also are gluten-free recipes, decorating tips, baking guidelines, vegan shopping advice, and Isa’s true cupcake anecdotes from the trenches.

When Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World, no dessert lover can resist.

Restaurants Near You

Even if you don’t live in a big city with fully vegan restaurants, there is a surprisingly large number of vegan options for eating out almost anywhere in the world. Check out two of the most popular resources below to find options near you. Please be advised, while these can be excellent resources for finding vegan options, the unfortunately also label options which are devoid of flesh, but still very nonvegan.

Vegan Food is Everywhere

With a fresh design and tons of listings all over the world, VFIE is our number one recommendation for finding vegan and vegan-friendly establishments.

HappyCow

HappyCow is one of the oldest resources for finding vegan restaurants near you.

VegGuide

VegGuide is similar to HappyCow, but with a more streamlined, minimalist interface making it fast and easy to search.

Vegan Stores

Here are a few places to get vegan products delivered to you

 

    • Vegan Essentials
      VE, as the name implies, is all vegan with a wide selection of foods for humans and nonhumans as well as clothing and other specialty items.
    • Amazon.com
      While not an exclusively vegan storefront, Amazon actually has a large directory of vegan foods available in bulk in their grocery department.
    • Pangea
      Pangea, also known as TheVeganStore.com is an all vegan storefront much like Vegan Essentials.

Veganism is not just a diet, but a moral obligation if we wish to strike at the roots of speciesism in all its forms. Veganism is a moral imperative if we wish to bring an end to an injustice to all animals. Veganism is the very least that we owe to the thinking, feeling creatures with whom we share the Earth.

— Khaetlyn L. Grindell

A great site to visit: www.howdoigovegan.com

How does Calcium, Magnesium and Potassium benefit our bodies ?

All three contain chemicals that help promote muscle relaxation and assist in nerve transmission. They help maintain a healthy blood pressure. People suffering from hypertension are highly recommended to include foods rich in potassium in their diet – Potassium (K) is also vital for other body functions that include proper functioning of the nervous system, kidneys, heart, and the musculoskeletal system. Potassium deficiency, or hypokalemia, can cause fatigue, problems in muscle coordination, weakness, etc. Foods high in potassium are beneficial for diabetic patients, as they help in proper functioning of the pancreas. Very high levels of potassium, or hyperkalemia, can cause health problems like kidney failure, so everything in moderation. Fresh fruits and vegetables make some of the best foods that are high in potassium.

A comprehensive list of such foods is given below:

•Apricots
•Avocado
•Bananas
•Beet
•Broccoli
•Brussels Sprouts
•Cantaloupe
•Carrots
•Cauliflower
•Chickpeas
•Dates
•Figs
•Kiwi Fruit
•Beans
•Honeydew Melons
•Nectarines
•Oranges
•Pears (fresh)
•Peanuts
•Baked Potatoes
•Prunes
•Raisins
•Spinach
•Tomatoes
•Canned Sauce
•Winter Squash

Though Calcium (Ca) is necessary for maintaining healthy bones and teeth, it also helps to regulate blood pressure. It also helps in healing of wounds, and in producing key enzymes that aid in digestion and metabolism. Adequate intake of calcium is a must for people of all age groups. The amount of calcium required by the body, increases with increasing age. As we grow older, our bodies need more calcium for maintaining strong bones. There are no specific symptoms associated with calcium deficiency. Just like with any other mineral, the intake of calcium should not exceed beyond our body’s requirement of the mineral.

Here’s a list of common foods that are rich sources of calcium:

•Almonds
•Beans
•Brazil nuts
•Broccoli
•Celery
•Collard greens
•Flaxseeds
•Instant oats
•Kale
•Kelp
•Oranges
•Papaya
•Sesame seeds
•Spinach
•Swiss chard
•Tahini

Magnesium (Mg) is an essential mineral that plays an important role in metabolism. Many people are unaware of the significance of magnesium and hence, suffer from health problems related to magnesium deficiency. Almost 300 bio-chemical reactions take place in the body with the help of magnesium. Magnesium is necessary for production of energy in the body. It also helps to regulate blood pressure in a natural way. Magnesium plays a key role in protein synthesis, and synthesis of enzymes. Symptoms of low magnesium, include heart palpitation, fatigue, fibromyalgia, kidney stones, osteoporosis, tics and twitches, diabetes, etc. To get the required amounts of magnesium, one should consume raw food rather than processed food.

Given here is a list of common foods that are rich in magnesium:

•Black beans
•Broccoli
•Peanuts
•Soy milk
•Spinach
•Tofu
•Whole grains
•Whole wheat bread

Eat well, do good and stay vegan.

So where will I get my proteins?

Not a day goes by where I am not asked about protein and a plant-based diet via Facebook messages, emails, or in my day-to-day life.

So here are 9 facts about protein to help answer those questions:

1. Protein is not a food group, but a macronutrient found in varying quantities in all intact whole plant foods even bananas and rice, touted for their carbs.

2. The Institute of Medicine’s Dietary Reference Intake for protein is 56 grams per day for males and 46 grams per day for females aged 19 years and older. Or else, 0.8 grams per kilogram bodyweight per day.

3. Protein superstars include legumes (beans, lentils, peas), nuts and nut butters, seeds and seed butters, leafy greens, and (non-GMO, whole) soy products.

4. Too much protein is taxing on the kidneys and can promote gout and cancer growth.

5. Plant sources of protein are packaged beautifully with thousands of other nutrients that work synergistically to support immune function and health.

6. Plant sources are superior to animal sources of protein because they are not filled with health-challenging substances such as carcinogens, high levels of saturated fat, hormones, steroids, etc.

7. Plant sources of protein are cruelty-free.

8. Opting for plant protein is exponentially better on the planet.

9. Athletes will automatically increase protein intake with increased caloric intake. It is ideal for athletes to get protein from plant sources because phytochemicals and antioxidants are crucial for recovery and are abundant in plant foods.

~ Active Vegan ~

How to get your vegan pantry started.

Stocking a vegan pantry is easy. Going vegan has never been easier than it is right now!

If you care enough about animals, our environment, and your health, then you are on your way to going vegan, and it’s never been as easy as it is right now! It’s up to you to make the switch and do what you believe is moral and just. We want to encourage you as much as we possibly can with information that shall set you off in the right direction.

With a full on vegan pantry in play and the right mind set, you simply cannot go wrong! Remember to give your palette a couple of weeks to adjust and get used to not consuming animal products. Once your palettes have been ‘reset’ to clean and healthy whole foods, you shall never look back again!
This list may not be a surprise to someone who is already vegan however, it can be a great resource to someone who is a lacto-vegetarian trying to become vegan. It is also a great resource for just about anyone looking to create healthy and delicious meals though . Having the right and basic ingredients in your pantry means you can cook a healthy meal, hopefully in a short time after you come home from a busy and tiring workday. Being vegan is not difficult but it takes a little effort on our part, especially when we are starting out. A vegan pantry does not contain any animal products, yet you can make wonderful meals with what you have on hand.

Here are some of the basic ingredients you will need in addition to groceries you may already have:


Whole Grains:


* Whole Wheat Couscous
* Brown Rice
* Quinoa (Pronounced Keen-wah)
* Amaranth
* Barley
* Oats
* Millet
* Spelt Flour:
* Whole Wheat
* Wheat Pastry flour (Good substitute for Maida or while flour)
* Teff Flour
* Soy Flour
* Besan (Gram flour)
* Rice Flour
* Beans flour (Any beans)
* Grains flour
* Semolina (Rava)

Pasta (check labels because pasta can contain eggs) :


* Various pasta shapes, like fettucine, linguini, angel-hair, spaghetti, penne, ziti, orechiette, farfalle, elbow pasta, lasagna noodles, orzo, to name but a few.
* Spinach pasta
* Gnocchi
* Rice noodles
* Soba noodles
* Potatoes Pirogies

Non-dairy products: (there is a wide range of non-dairy products, please do check them out).


* Soy Milk (Plain, Vanilla and Chocolate)
* Rice milk
* Almond milk
* Soy yogurt
* Vegan sour cream
* Vegan cream cheese
* Soy and other Vegan Cheeses
* Earth Balance or other vegan butters
* Peanut butter
* Tahini (Made with Sesame Seeds)
* Cashew butter

Legumes:


* Chickpeas
* Peas
* White beans (Cannelloni)
* Red kidney beans
* Pinto beans
* Various lentils
* Black Beans
* Black-eyed peas
* Peas

Sweeteners: (Many vegans do not eat regular sugar, as more than 50 percent of cane refineries around the world, use bone char which is a charcoal made from animal bone in refining and filtering process. Honey is also not a vegan substitute for sugar as it comes from a bee).


* Vegan sugar (white, powdered and brown)
* Agave Nectar
* Rice Syrup
* Maple Syrup

* Coconut sugar and coconut nectar


Oils :


* Olive oil (Regular and Extra Virgin)
* Canola
* Flax seed oil
* Sesame oil (great for Chinese recipes)
* Coconut oil (It is good for baking as well for your hair)
* Walnut oil

Nuts and Seeds:


* Pine nuts (expensive, but great for Italian dishes and pesto)
* Pecans
* Peanuts
* Almonds
* Walnuts
* Sunflower seeds
* Nigella seeds
* Pumpkin seeds
* Sesame seed (while, black)

* Hemp seed (another wonderful well rounded protein and omega base)

Canned goods: (Please always read your labels concerning shelf items as there may be some ‘hidden baddies’ in there. You will get to know which are safe to consume).


* Coconut milk and cream
* Tomatoes (diced, peeled and pureed, with spices)
* Garbanzo beans
* Green beans
* Kidney beans
* Cannelloni beans
* Artichoke hearts
* Olive in Brine
* Fruits such as mango, apricot, mandarin organges, mixed fruit
* Canned vegetables such as green beans, corn, potatoes, pumpkin, yams, and more
* Water chestnut and baby corn

Dry Herbs and Spices: (There are so many beautiful dry herbs and spices, please do enjoy them all).


* Chili Powder
* Turmeric
* Paprika (Spanish and Hungarian, which is sweeter)
* Chipotle chilies in adobo sauce
* Oregano (Mexican and regular)
* Thyme
* Garlic powder
* Ginger powder
* Sage
* Bay leaves
* Cinnamon
* Garam masala
* Nutmeg
* All spice
* Cloves
* Basil
* Cumin

Fresh Herbs: (Do consider growing some of these in your garden and on your kitchen window sill! Many are so easy and fun to cultivate, and fresh herbs are so divine).


* Cilantro
* Basil
* Mint
* Ginger
* Garlic
* Thyme
* Lemon grass

Vegetables and Fruits: (The list is endless! Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables seasonally).

* Chayote
* Onion (Leeks, Shallots, Red, Yellow, White, Scallion)
* Avocado
* Eggplant (various types)
* Cucumber
* Okra
* Bell Pepper or Capsicum (Green, Yellow, Red and Rare Purple)
* Squash (various types)
* Tomatoes and Tomatillos
* Artichokes
* Cauliflower
* Broccoli
* Cabbage (green, purple, Chinese, bok choy)
* Greens (collard, mustard, spinach, lettuce, watercress, kale, arugula)
* Brussels sprouts (a misunderstood vegetable that can be cooked deliciously)
* Endive and Sorrel
* Radishes
* Beets
* Carrots
* Mushrooms
* Yams, Sweet Potatoes
* Parsnip. Rutabagas
* Turnips
* Potatoes (red, white, regular and Peruvian purple)
* Asparagus
* Celery
* Chard
* Kohlrabi
* Taro
* Jerusalem Artichoke
* Jicama
* Corn
* Zucchini
* Apples
* Grapes (green, purple)
* Peaches
* Nectarines
* Figs
* Apricots
* Cherries
* Strawberries
* Blueberries
* Blackberries
* Mango
* Watermelon
* Plums
* Pears
* Kiwis
* Oranges (mandarin, blood oranges, clementines)
* Tangerines
* Lemons, Limes
* Grapefruit
* Banana (baby and regular)
* Dates
* Lychees
* Persimmons
* Gooseberries
* Guavas
* Passion Fruit
* Breadfruit
* Sitaphal (custard apples)
* Star Fruit
* Pomegranate
* Cherimoya
* Pineapple

Other Misc: 


* Miso
* Soy sauce
* Thai curry sauce
* Topica pearls
* Vegan Chocolate
* Sea Vegetables
* Seitan
* Tofu
* Soy ready made burger
* Tempeh
* TVP (Textured Vegetable Protein)

* Sprouts and sprouting has amazing health benefits! We do recommend that you get more hands on with these little guys!

Egg Replacer Suggestions: (Baked goods made with eggs come out chewy and moist but they come at a very high cost, especially to chickens who live in very inhumane conditions and are subjected to pain and suffering. Eggs also come at a high cost to humans as they are loaded with antibiotics and hormones and are high in cholesterol. Eggs can also carry salmonella).


It is possible to make chewy and moist baked goods without using eggs. The measures below correspond to 1 egg. If you’re using more, adjust accordingly:


* 1 teaspoon soy flour + 1 tablespoon water
* 1/2 mashed banana (for baking sweet goods)
* 4 tablespoons unsweetened applesauce
* 1/4 cup pureed tofu with little added water
* 1 tablespoon ground flax seeds (flax meal) + 3 tablespoons water
* Store bought egg substitutes.

Choose what works for you and your family. The ultimate goal is to eat healthy, natural and unprocessed food that is good for us, saves animals and improves our environment.

Are you vegan? Are you thinking about making the switch? Did this list help and inspire you to add and or make the switch on your next shop! Please leave your comment in our comment box, we would love to hear from you, and please share this list out to others whom you think shall benefit!

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~ Active Vegan ~