Food – about vegan food.

Going vegan is derived only from plant based foods. Vegans do not use or consume any animals or animal products including flesh (land or sea animals), milk, eggs, or honey.

Eating vegan doesn’t require breaking the bank or moving to a big city. The most nutritious and inexpensive vegan foods which can be found in any supermarket, are fresh produce, grains, legumes and nuts/seeds. These should make up the bulk of the diet for optimum health. Vegan processed foods in the form of soy hot dogs, vegan &”cheeses,” desserts, etc are best eaten only on occasion. The following information will help you ease into going vegan with so much more confidence.

Isn’t vegan food boring?

A popular myth is that vegans subsist only on soybeans and salad. In reality, vegans eat everything non-vegans eat, but without the animal products and likely with more variety from special foods.

Common vegan dishes include stir fry, pasta, rice and beans, chana masala, cucumber-avocado sushi, pad thai, quinoa, pizza, pancakes, French toast, waffles, veggie burgers, chili, soups, tacos, burritos, casseroles, stew, sandwiches, cookies, non-dairy ice-cream and other delicious frozen vegan confectionaries, cakes, pies, etc.

Nutrition & Health

Nutritional deficiencies are a concern for everyone. While vegans statistically enjoy longer life spans than the average human being, we are not exempt from this reality. First and foremost, you should ensure you are receiving enough Vitamin B-12, Omega-3, and Vitamin D. See below for more detailed information on vegan nutrition.

Protein: Because animal-based foods are high in protein, it’s a common misconception that vegans don’t get enough of it. In fact, the real problem is nonvegans getting too much protein. Vegans can get all the protein they need from lentils, tempeh, tofu, beans, nuts, seeds, and even vegetables.

We highly recommend the book, Becoming Vegan by Brenda Davis and Vesanto Melina. M.S., R.D for more detailed information pertaining to ones age and individual needs. They provide sample menu plans and nutrition recommendations for children, teenagers, pregnancy, and athletes as well as a wealth of information on proper nutrition. Also, be sure to check out The Boston Vegan Association’s Nutritional Pamphlet

Calcium: (Approximately 1000 milligrams per day, 1200 milligrams for women over 51 and men over 70.) Leafy green vegetables-kale, collards, broccoli, okra, figs, oranges, almonds, pistachio nuts, hazelnuts, flaxseed, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, soybeans, chickpeas, navy beans, pinto beans, kidney beans, lentils, tempeh, tofu*, fortified non-dairy yogurt, fortified non-dairy milks, fortified soy products, fortified breakfast cereals, and fortified orange juice. Note: Spinach, beet greens, and chard are healthy foods but not good sources of calcium.

When purchasing tofu, look for the calcium-set tofu with “calcium sulphate” in the ingredients.

Iron: Chickpeas (hummus), lentils, navy beans, pinto beans, kidney beans, soybeans, quinoa, tofu, raisins, goji berries, fortified veggie burgers and other soy products, pumpkin seeds, cashews, figs, sunflower seeds, sesame tahini, prunes, whole wheat, parsley, and pine nuts.

Tips

Vitamin-C rich foods help with iron absorption. Try eating these foods in the same meal. Use cast-iron cookware. If your iron status is low, avoid consuming foods high in zinc at the same meal.

B12: (2000 micrograms once a week or 10-100 micrograms a day.) Produced by bacteria and found in soil, water, etc, it is necessary for vegans to supplement their diet since most vegetables are cleaned very well. Vegans supplement their diets with B12 by eating nutritional yeast or fortified foods. Most non-dairy milks and cereals are fortified with B12. Consume at least three servings of vitamin B12-fortified food per day (each supplying at least 20% of the Daily Value on the label), Or, vegan B12 tablets, or slow release B12 patches are also available today. Very often nonvegans suffer from B12 deficiency – deficiencies can affect anyone who follows a poor diet following only processes fast foods etc.  (One 2000 mcg tablet (ideally chewed or dissolved under your tongue) once a week; or at least 10-100 mcg once a day.)Buy Nutritional Yeast Buy Vitamin B12 Tablets

Omega-3: Two tablespoons of ground flax seeds every day or two teaspoons daily of flax seed oil. And/or, an omega 3 DHA supplement in the form of algae.

 

Vitamin D: Light skin-about 10-15 minutes of sunshine. Dark skin: about 30 minutes of sunshine daily depending on the time of year, etc. Buy vegan Vitamin D3 Note: Vitamin D3 found in many fortified orange juices comes from the wool of sheep and is not vegan.

The information here is intended as a helpful overview but cannot cover all vegan nutrition topics. To make sure that your diet is meeting all the nutrients that your body and mind need, please consult a nutrition professional with expertise in vegan diets should you feel the need, preferably consult a vegan physician – one who has extensive knowledge on healthy vegan foods. Also it is preferable to obtain nutrients from a healthy well balanced vegan diet to those of pills where possible. When going vegan it is very likely that your health will improve whilst doing it correctly.

Special Foods

Spend some time with a vegan and you may be surprised to learn a vegan’s diet is not just the standard diet minus animal products. There are several kinds of foods which have gained recognition as vegan staples.

Tempeh

Tempeh (“tem-pea” or “tem-pay”) is like tofu, but fermented and pressed to be thick and savoury. An easy way to prepare tempeh is to fry or grill with blended seasonings meant for grilling. Check your ingredients, of course, but surprisingly many are vegan.

 

Tofu

Tofu is a solid food made from pressed soybean curd. It’s one of the most unusual vegan staples in that it can be used to make a breakfast dish like  scrambled tofu, a dinner dish like pan fried tofu, or even a chocolate mousse dessert. Tofu gets a bad wrap in popular culture as a tasteless food, but tofu isn’t meant to be a flavour agent. It works best at soaking up flavours and giving them a texture and consistency.

Seitan

Seitan is a chewy and naturally brown substance made from wheat gluten, an isolated protein found in wheat. Seitan is usually cut into strips and baked or fried to provide some protein and chewiness to a dish.

Like tempeh, seitan is very easy to prepare and needs little to no seasoning.

Nutritional Yeast

Nutritional yeast is very different from the yeast used in bread. Nutritional yeast, which comes powdered or in flakes, is most often used to provide a cheesy consistency. Unlike cheese, nutritional yeast also lasts far longer and has no cholesterol. Sprinkle in soup, on popcorn, or add water to make cheesy sauces.

Red Star Nutritional Yeast

Ingredients

The number of nonvegan ingredients found in food and products is too numerous to mention here, but we’ve included some of the most common below.

Common Nonvegan Ingredients

  • Casein
    Casein is a protein from milk. Surprisingly, can often found in soy cheeses –  so beware!
  • Carmine/Carminic Acid
    Also known as Crimson Lake, Cochineal, Natural Red 4, C.I. 75470, or E120, carmine is made from crushed cochineal insects with bright red shells. Often used as a red food coloring.
  • Beeswax
    Beeswax, as the name implies comes from honeybees. Why isn’t honey/beeswax vegan?
  • Gelatin
    Gelatin is a substance produced from the collagen found in animal bones and hoofs. This is often used for marshmallows, Jello®, and as a preservative.
  • Vitamin D3
    Often found in fortified orange juice, vitamin D3 comes from Lanolin, a sheep product. D2, however, is vegan.
  • Whey
    Whey is a milk protein often used as a protein boost in some commercial foods.

Replacements

Here are some quick tips for using vegan ingredients to replace the animal products in your favourite recipes

Eggs

  • Apple Sauce
    Applesauce will give off a gas while being cooked, making your baked goods fluffy. It’s also doesn’t require adding as much liquid as powdered replacers. 1/4 cup applesauce = 1 egg
  • Ground Flax Seed
    When ground to a powder and liquified with water, ground flax seed creates a gooey texture great for binding. It’s also full of protein and omega-3s. 1 tbsp ground flax + 3 tbsp water = 1 egg.
  • Banana
    Like applesauce, bananas are naturally sweet. They also have strong binding properties when used baked goods. 1/2 banana = 1 egg
  • Baking soda/powder
    When you really need your dish fluffy without extra flavor, simple baking soda or baking powder does wonders. 1 tsp baking powder + 1 1/2 tbs water + 1 1/2 tbs oil or 1 tbs vinegar + 1 tsp baking soda = 1 egg.
More wonderful egg substitutes can be found here (egg replacements)

Milk

  • Soy/Oat/Hemp/Almond/etc. milk
    By now, you’ve probably heard of the increasingly popular nut- and bean-derived milk products making their way into grocery stores. While soymilk is probably the most prevalent, some prefer rice milk for its naturally light and sweet flavour and almond milk for a boost of Vitamin E, monounsaturated fats, dietary fiber, and B vitamins.

More about milk replacements here (milk replacements)

  • Vegetable Oil
    The only difference between a fat and an oil is that a fat is a solid at room temperature. Often when milk is used in foods like mashed potatoes, it’s the fat that makes it creamy. Substituting this for vegetable or olive oil is equally as satisfying and much healthier.

Check out some ideas for a healthy vegan pantry here (vegan pantry to help get you started)

Food Blogs

Cookbooks

The New American Vegan by Vincent J. Guihan

Weaving together personal stories with 120 appetizing recipes, this friendly cookbook delivers authentically American and vegan cuisine that has to be tasted to be believed. Midwestern-inspired recipes range from very basic to the modestly complicated, but always with an eye on creating something beautiful and delicious in its simplicity.

Clear text provides step-by-step instructions and helps new cooks find their feet in a vegan kitchen, with a whole chapter devoted to terms, tools, and techniques. With an eye towards improvisation, the cookbook provides a detailed basic recipe that is good as-is, while providing additional notes that explain how to take each recipe further—to increase flavor, to add drama to the presentation, or just to add extra flourish.”

Vegan Yum Yum by Lauren Ulm

“When Lauren Ulm went vegan, she faced the typical onslaught of questions from acquaintances and more than the occasional wince from unsuspecting dinner guests. Vowing to prove that vegan food can be decadent and delicious—and not a bland stand-in for ‘normal’ food—she created a blog, veganyumyum.com. What began as a hobby became an obsession….

Here in her debut cookbook, Lauren shows that vegan food is anything but dull, with her creative and quirky twists on everything from crowd-pleasing appetizers to indulgent desserts, from easy weekend breakfasts to speedy weeknight dinners, plus holiday- and company-worthy fare you can serve with pride.”

The Vegan Table by Colleen Patrick-Goudreau

“A celebration of plant-based cuisine, The Vegan Table offers recipes and menus for every occasion and season, including romantic meals, traditional tea parties, formal dinners, casual gatherings, children’s parties, and holiday feasts.

Packed with invaluable tips, expert advice, fascinating lore, delicious recipes, and gorgeous full-color photographs, The Vegan Table is the ultimate guide, whether you are hosting an intimate gathering of close friends or a large party with an open guest list.

Organized by themed menus, the eclectic mix of recipes features cuisines from around the world, including Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, Mexican, Asian, Indian, and African. Follow the menus provided, or create your own using the array of appetizers, soups, stews, salads, main dishes, and desserts.”

Let them Eat Vegan by Dreena Burton

“Vegan food has come a long way in the past decade. The once ubiquitous dry, packaged veggie burger is no longer the poster child for an animal-free diet.

It has evolved into a creative, sophisticated cuisine touted by the likes of Food & Wine magazine. Long at the fore of vegan blogging and cooking, Dreena Burton has been known for making healthy taste delicious. Let Them Eat Vegan! distills more than fifteen years of recipe development that emphasize unrefined, less-processed ingredients–no white flour or white sugar, but instead whole-grain flours, natural sweeteners, raw foods, and plenty of beans ’n greens.

There’s no relying on meat analogues here, either–just hearty, healthy food that looks and tastes great. As the mother of three young girls, Burton always keeps their nutrition–and taste buds–in mind. From the simplest comfort foods like Warm ‘Vegveeta’ Cheese Sauce to the more sophisticated Anise-and Coriander-Infused Orange Lentil Soup, these recipes will delight and inspire even the pickiest eaters and provide lifelong vegans with the innovative, wholesome recipes they’ve always wanted.”

The 30 Minute Vegan by Mark Reinfeld and Jennifer Murray

“Busy vegans, rejoice! award-winning husband and wife chefs/authors Reinfeld and Murray present 150 delicious, easy-to prepare recipes for everyday vegan cooking—all dishes that can be prepared in a half-hour.

Sections include The Lighter Side of Life: Smoothies & Satiating Beverages; Snacks, Pick Me Ups & Kids’ Favorites; Lunches: Wraps, Rolls, Bowls, and More; Extraordinary Salads; Sumptuous Soups; Small Plates: Appetizers, Side Dishes, Light Dinners; Wholesome Suppers; Guilt-Free Comfort Food: Healthy Translations of Old Stand-bys; and Divine Desserts.

The 30-Minute Vegan also provides at-a-glance cooking charts, kids’ favorite dishes, and exciting menu suggestions for every occasion—making this an essential cookbook for busy vegans who want to enjoy delicious, healthful, whole-foods vegan fare every day.”

Desserts

The Joy of Vegan Baking by Colleen Patrick-Goudreau

“A seasoned cooking instructor and self-described “joyful vegan,” author Colleen Patrick-Goudreau puts to rest the myth that vegan baking is an inferior alternative to non-vegan baking, putting it in its rightful place as a legitimate contender in the baking arena.

More than just a collection of recipes, this informative cookbook is a valuable resource for any baker — novice or seasoned. Learn just how easy it is to enjoy your favorite homespun goodies without compromising your health or values.”

Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World by Isa Chandra Moskowitz and Terry Hope Romero

The hosts of the vegan cooking show The Post Punk Kitchen are back with a vengeance — and this time, dessert.

A companion volume to Vegan with a Vengeance, Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World is a sweet and sassy guide to baking everyone’s favorite treat without using any animal products. This unique cookbook contains over 50 recipes for cupcakes and frostings — some innovative, some classics — with beautiful full color photographs. Isa and Terry offer delicious, cheap, dairy-free, egg-free and vegan-friendly recipes like Classic Vanilla Cupcakes (with chocolate frosting), Crimson Velveteen Cupcakes (red velvet with creamy white frosting), Linzer Torte Cupcakes (hazelnut with raspberry and chocolate ganache), Chai Latte Cupcakes (with powdered sugar) and Banana Split Cupcakes (banana-chocolate chip-pineapple with fluffy frosting). Included also are gluten-free recipes, decorating tips, baking guidelines, vegan shopping advice, and Isa’s true cupcake anecdotes from the trenches.

When Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World, no dessert lover can resist.

Restaurants Near You

Even if you don’t live in a big city with fully vegan restaurants, there is a surprisingly large number of vegan options for eating out almost anywhere in the world. Check out two of the most popular resources below to find options near you. Please be advised, while these can be excellent resources for finding vegan options, the unfortunately also label options which are devoid of flesh, but still very nonvegan.

Vegan Food is Everywhere

With a fresh design and tons of listings all over the world, VFIE is our number one recommendation for finding vegan and vegan-friendly establishments.

HappyCow

HappyCow is one of the oldest resources for finding vegan restaurants near you.

VegGuide

VegGuide is similar to HappyCow, but with a more streamlined, minimalist interface making it fast and easy to search.

Vegan Stores

Here are a few places to get vegan products delivered to you

 

    • Vegan Essentials
      VE, as the name implies, is all vegan with a wide selection of foods for humans and nonhumans as well as clothing and other specialty items.
    • Amazon.com
      While not an exclusively vegan storefront, Amazon actually has a large directory of vegan foods available in bulk in their grocery department.
    • Pangea
      Pangea, also known as TheVeganStore.com is an all vegan storefront much like Vegan Essentials.

Veganism is not just a diet, but a moral obligation if we wish to strike at the roots of speciesism in all its forms. Veganism is a moral imperative if we wish to bring an end to an injustice to all animals. Veganism is the very least that we owe to the thinking, feeling creatures with whom we share the Earth.

— Khaetlyn L. Grindell

A great site to visit: www.howdoigovegan.com

High powered chia breakfast.

Spoil yourself to a high powered chia breakfast packed with healthy protein and omega’s – throw in some berries for antioxidant’s and a little thinly sliced banana for potassium – add warm almond milk and a drizzle of coconut nectar, and you have yourself a kings breakfast!

Chia – so easy to make, underrated, this breakfast ought to be on every breakfast menu in the world. Everyone would benefit from consuming this at least once per week. Versatile – any fruit will compliment chia together with non dairy milk.

Use chia as a power breakfast, pop it into your smoothies, make delicious desserts and, use chia in place egg.

Serves 3:

Ingredients:

50 grams chia (soak in boiled water)
3 x 250ml almond milk
2 bananas (sliced)
6 large strawberries (quartered)
9 raspberries (whole)
coconut nectar

To make:

Add your chia to a bowl together with boiled water. Chia grows to about 3-4 times it’s size, so add two x 250ml water first, then add more as you require and allow to soak for a couple of minutes. You will end up with a ‘gooey’ texture.

Whilst that is happening – prepare your fruit, and heat up your almond milk on a low temperature.

Add your chia mix to your milk and stir until smooth and desired temperature. Serve to your breakfast bowls and garnish with your choice of fruit. A final drizzle of coconut nectar to finish off and enjoy!

P.S. – Please note that the consistency of your breakfast is a personal choice, should you wish for your bowl of chia to be thicker in consistency, then add less milk or more chia to the mix. This for me is just perfect!

Vegan Chef On The Run

Protein – healthy vegan protein.

Vegan protein is the richest, healthiest, most nutritious form of protein available to you today – so embrace all the wonderful varieties, flavours, and textures on offer to you right now for better health and off course zero violence! Let’s ‘debunk’ the protein myth once and for all yea!

Proteins are known as the building blocks of life: In the body, they break down into amino acids that promote cell growth and repair. (They also take longer to digest than carbohydrates, helping you feel fuller for longer and on fewer calories—a plus for anyone trying to lose weight.) You probably know that animal products—meat, eggs and dairy—are really bad sources of protein and are also high in saturated fat and cholesterol. What you may not know is that you don’t need to eat animal flesh or any forms of dairy to get enough protein. Check out these amazing healthy sources of natural protein!

Green peas;

 

Foods in the legume family are good sources of vegan protein, and peas are no exception: One cup contains 7.9 grams—about the same as a cup of milk only so much more healthier. (For the record, women should get about 46 grams of protein per day, and men need about 56.) If you don’t like peas as a side dish, try blending them into a pesto. Blend  peas, toasted pine nuts, fresh mint, olive oil, and vegan parmesan cheese and or nutritional yeast.   An all-time favourite  corpse -free meals!

Quinoa;

Most grains contain a small amount of protein, but quinoa—technically a seed—is unique in that it contains more than 8 grams per cup, including all nine essential amino acids that the body needs for growth and repair, but cannot produce on its own. (Because of that, it’s often referred to as a “perfect protein.”) Plus, it’s amazingly versatile: Quinoa can be added to soup or vegan chili during winter months, served with natural sources of  sugar and fruit as a hot breakfast cereal, or tossed with vegetables and a vinaigrette to make a refreshing summer salad.

Nuts and nut butter;

All nuts contain both healthy fats and protein, making them a valuable part of a plant-based diet. But because they are high in calories—almonds, cashews, and pistachios for example, all contain 160 calories and 5 or 6 grams of protein per ounce—choose varieties that are raw or dry roasted. Nut butters, like peanut and almond butter, are also a good way to get protein.   Look for brands with as few ingredients as possible.

Beans;

There are many different varieties of beans—black, white, pinto, heirloom, etc.—but one thing they all have in common is their high amounts of protein. Two cups of kidney beans, for example, contain about 26 grams.  If you want to buy them dried and soak them overnight before you cook them, that’s super fantastic and shall save you on costing’s.

Chickpeas;

Also known as garbanzo beans, these legumes can be tossed into salads, fried and salted as a crispy snack, or pureed into a hummus. They contain 7.3 grams of protein in just half a cup, and are also high in fiber and low in calories.  You can make a really great meal with some whole-wheat flatbread, some veggies, and some homemade hummus.  Toss  chickpeas in the blender with some herbs and some tahini or walnut oil and you’re good to go.

Tempeh and tofu;

Foods made from soybeans are some of the highest vegan sources of protein: Tempeh and tofu, for example, contain about 15 and 20 grams per half cup, respectively.  They’re highly nutritious, and they can really take on the taste and texture of whatever type of food you’re looking for.  You can get a really soft tofu and mash it with a fork, or you can get a firm one and have a really substantial product that can stand in as a replacement for unhealthy ‘meat’.

Edamame;

Not crazy about meat substitutes? Get your servings of soy the way it appears in nature: Straight from the soybean, still in the pod. Boiled edamame, which contains 8.4 grams of protein per half cup, can be served hot or cold and sprinkled with salt. Try it as a snack, an appetizer before dinner, or added to salads or pastas (minus the shell, of course.)

Leafy greens;

Some vegetables don’t have nearly as much protein as legumes and nuts  but some do contain significant amounts—along with lots of antioxidants and heart-healthy fiber.  If someone is eating a lot of vegetables—and a wide variety of different types of vegetables—it will certainly add up to a good amount of amino acids.  Two cups of raw spinach, for example, contain 2.1 grams of protein, and one cup of chopped broccoli contains 8.1 grams.

Hemp;

Adding hemp to your diet does not mean you’re eating rope (or marijuana),  you can find it in some cereals and trail mixes, or you can buy hemp seeds (10 grams of protein in 3 tablespoons) and add them to smoothies, pesto’s, or baked goods. Hemp milk can also be a dairy-free way to add protein to your diet, and it’s even lower in calories than skim milk.

Chia seeds;

These seeds – are an easy way to add protein (4.7 grams per ounce, about two tablespoons) and fiber to almost any recipe:  Chia seeds can be sprinkled over salads, stirred into vegan yogurt or oatmeal, blended into smoothies, or they can take center stage: They plump up and take on a gelatinous texture when soaked in a liquid, forming a rich and creamy pudding-like treat.

Sesame, sunflower and poppy seeds;

Don’t discount the other seeds in your pantry though either; the more familiar varieties are also high in protein and healthy fats.  (Per volume, sunflower seed kernels non GMO  contain the most protein—7.3 grams per quarter cup—followed by sesame seeds and poppy seeds at 5.4 grams each.) Try thinking of outside-the-box ways to add more seeds to your diet.  Instead of saving poppy seeds for once a year for your holiday bread, try adding them to a vinaigrette.

Seitan;

Another ‘meat’ substitute popular with vegans, seitan is made from wheat gluten, seasoned with salt and savoury flavour’s and loaded with protein—36 grams per half cup, more than either tofu or tempeh.  It looks like duck meat and tastes like chicken (sounds yuck but minus the ‘yuck’ – if you know what we mean) , and can be used in any recipe that calls for ‘poultry’.

Non-dairy milk;

Milk alternatives aren’t just for the lactose intolerant: They can be great additions to any diet; just watch out for lots of added sugar and flavour’s  –  most can now also be made by yourselves with simple kitchen add ons such as blenders and nut bags and are so easy to make in less than 35 seconds, and so much more cost effective.  (Plain soy milk, for example, contains about 100 calories per cup—comparable to skim milk’s 80 calories—but the flavoured varieties can contain much more.) Soy milk has the most protein, at 4 to 8 grams per 8 ounces, but almond, hemp, and rice milk also contain about 1 gram per cup.

Unsweetened cocoa powder;

Bet you didn’t know you can get protein from chocolate! Unsweetened cocoa powder—the pure  type used in baking or making hot chocolate from scratch—contains about 1 gram of protein per tablespoon. The powder is bitter all by itself, however, so most recipes may call for natural healthy sugar and oils. Stick with non-fat (or almond milk) and choose healthy plant based sweeteners for a healthy, low-cal hot cocoa, or add it to air-popped popcorn (along with sugar, allspice, and cayenne pepper) for a sweet and spicy whole-grain treat.

Still worried about protein – worry no more. There is enough protein in almost every healthy plant based source available to you, and we really don’t need that much at all. As long as you are eating a healthy well balance vegan form of source, you are sure to get more than enough healthy protein.  Eat well – do good and everything else shall fall into place. Worry no more!

~ Active Vegan ~

So where will I get my proteins?

Not a day goes by where I am not asked about protein and a plant-based diet via Facebook messages, emails, or in my day-to-day life.

So here are 9 facts about protein to help answer those questions:

1. Protein is not a food group, but a macronutrient found in varying quantities in all intact whole plant foods even bananas and rice, touted for their carbs.

2. The Institute of Medicine’s Dietary Reference Intake for protein is 56 grams per day for males and 46 grams per day for females aged 19 years and older. Or else, 0.8 grams per kilogram bodyweight per day.

3. Protein superstars include legumes (beans, lentils, peas), nuts and nut butters, seeds and seed butters, leafy greens, and (non-GMO, whole) soy products.

4. Too much protein is taxing on the kidneys and can promote gout and cancer growth.

5. Plant sources of protein are packaged beautifully with thousands of other nutrients that work synergistically to support immune function and health.

6. Plant sources are superior to animal sources of protein because they are not filled with health-challenging substances such as carcinogens, high levels of saturated fat, hormones, steroids, etc.

7. Plant sources of protein are cruelty-free.

8. Opting for plant protein is exponentially better on the planet.

9. Athletes will automatically increase protein intake with increased caloric intake. It is ideal for athletes to get protein from plant sources because phytochemicals and antioxidants are crucial for recovery and are abundant in plant foods.

~ Active Vegan ~

Benefit from seeds!

Quality of health increases through regular consumption of seeds.

Seed are not just excellent for birds, they benefit humans tremendously, and they are a superfood source that you really do want to incorporate into your daily meal plan!  You can eat them in larger quantities as a main course, grind them into butters,  flax seed can be used as a healthy egg substitute (1 t flax to 3 part water),  you can pop them into smoothies,  drinks and make desserts with them,  sprinkle them over any dish including salads and sandwiches, or use them in smaller quantities as garnishes for other foods. They’re inexpensive, convenient, and tasty. Here’s a brief rundown of some of the most commonly eaten seeds:

Flax seeds: Flax seeds are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, zinc, iron, calcium, and Vitamin E, and are a great addition to your diet. Newer food products that may contain them include cereals and crackers, but you can buy plain flax seeds as well. Flax seeds must be chewed thoroughly though to get the benefits. Since it’s difficult to completely chew this small seed, a better option is to grind them in a blender, food processor, or coffee grinder. Once they’re ground, you can add them to smoothies, bread dough, baked goods, and hot cereals. You can also use them as a healthy egg substitute in cooking and baking (1 t ground flax to 3 part water = 1 egg).

Chia seeds: great omega 3 to omega 6 ratio at slightly more 6 than 3, ALA, anti-inflammatory, laxative, soothing for the digestive tract calcium, copper, manganese, phosphorus, zinc, protein, fiber, different varieties vary quite a bit in nutritional make up. Great for breakfast, desserts and smoothies!

Hemp seeds: Commonly thought of as a “hippie” food, hemp has some significant health benefits. Hemp seeds are rich in protein, calcium, fiber, and omega-3 fatty acids. While hemp contains trace amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol, one of the compounds found in marijuana , you will not feel any effects by consuming products containing hemp. Stunning form of well rounded protein and amino acids! Versatile to almost every available dish you can think of. Best consumed in it’s raw form.

Pumpkin seeds: Pumpkin seeds, also known as pepitas, are chock full of magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, tryptophan, and iron. They’re also a good source of copper, zinc, and Vitamin K. You can buy prepackaged pumpkin seeds at most supermarkets, or you can make your own. Scoop out the seeds from a pumpkin’s inner cavity, rinse them off and dry them, then roast them for the best flavor.

Sesame seeds: Not just good on bagels or in Asian dishes, sesame seeds can jazz up salads, cereals, and yogurt. This tiny seed is loaded with copper and manganese, and also has plenty of calcium, magnesium, tryptophan, and iron. Toasting sesame seeds really brings out their flavor. Sesame seeds are a surprising source of the bone-building mineral calcium, great news for folks who have trouble tolerating dairy products. And seeds are a rich source of vitamin E. The only drawback: Some seeds are quite high in fat. Sunflower and sesame seeds provide about 80 percent of their calories as fat, although the fat is mostly of the heart-smart unsaturated variety.

Sunflower seeds: You can buy these shelled, but it’s more fun to buy them whole and crack open the hulls. Sunflower seeds are a tremendous source of Vitamin E and are also rich in Vitamin B1. Also a fantastic base for dips!

Seeds are the “eggs” that contain the nutrients needed to nourish the growth of a new plant. So their high nutrient content shouldn’t come as a surprise. What’s surprising is that we generally relegate these nutritional wonders to the occasional snack rather than making them staples of our diet. Adding more seeds to your meals shall strengthen your body as well as nourish your mind.

With their gold mine of healthy minerals and their niacin and folic-acid contents, seeds are an excellent nutrition package. They are among the better plant sources of iron and zinc. In fact, one ounce of pumpkin seeds contains almost twice as much iron as three ounces of skinless chicken breast. And they provide more fiber per ounce than nuts. They are also great  sources of protein.

Edible seeds are an important part of a raw food diet mainly for the essential fatty acids (EFA’s) they contain. EFA’s are polyunsaturated fats that the human body cannot produce, so they must be obtained from our diets. There are two groups of EFA’s; they are omega 3’s and omega 6’s. The omega 3 fatty acids are alpha linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The omega 6 essential fatty acids are linoleic acid (LA), gamalinolenic acid (GLA), and arachidonic acid (AA).

These EFA’s found in seeds balance and regulate energy production, blood circulation, nerve function, inflammation, hormone regulation, recovery from exercise, immune function, cell growth, and much more. A diet high in animal products and processed foods is high in omega 6’s which compete for the same metabolizing enzymes needed by the omega 3’s for assimilation. Most people’s diets don’t contain enough omega 3’s which upsets the important balance required for good health. When omega 6’s are consumed in excess they use up the metabolizing enzymes making them unavailable for omega 3 metabolism, so it makes complete sense to stop consuming ‘animal products’, and up your seed intake for optimum health and balance.

It’s common for people to consume over 20 times more omega 6 than omega 3, and this type of imbalance is associated with significant health issues including heart disease, stroke, cancer, Alzheimers, diabetes, mood disorders, arthritis, osteoporosis, inflammation, and obesity. Experts vary in their opinions of the ideal ratio with guidelines ranging anywhere from omega 6 to omega 3 of 4:1 to 1:2. When consuming a well balanced raw food diet including seeds, it should be easy to fall within these guidelines.

Research shows that eating seeds and the EFA’s they contain can elevate mood, improve brain function and development, and build a healthy circulatory system to name just a few. You can now see how including edible seeds in your daily diet shall go a long way in improving your health.

Like nuts, which are actually large seeds, edible seeds are best if soaked before eating, except hemp which does not have enzyme inhibitors. Edible seeds can be put into smoothies, ground and sprinkled over salads, mixed in raw recipes, or blended with citrus juice to make a super healthy salad dressing. These are just a few of the ways to make seeds and their magical EFA’s part of your daily diet.

We would very much love for you to share your recipes and inspirations with us, and to use this platform to share with others in order to encourage everyone on the right track!

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Why we love legumes!

Considering the health benefits of legumes, they ought to be known as “healthy people’s meat” instead of “poor people’s meat”, as they’re often called.

Also known as beans or pulses, they belong to an extremely large category of vegetables, containing more than 13,000 species and are second only to grains in supplying calories and protein to the world’s population.

Compared to grains, though, legumes supply about the same number of calories but usually two to four times as much proteins.

Despite their small size, beans pack a surprisingly rich and varied array of substances that are vital for good health.

Although it’s important to get all the amino acids, both essential and non-essential, it’s not necessary to get them from meat. In fact, because of its high unhealthy fat and cholesterol content – as well as the use of antibiotics and other chemicals in the raising of poultry and cattle etc, it is best to avoid animal derived food sources completely.

Beans, peas and lentils all belong to the legume family. You may also hear them called pulses, which is just another word for edible seeds. While their nutrient profiles vary a little from one legume to the next, most of them provide minerals, such as iron, magnesium and zinc. They all share two common characteristics: they’re excellent sources of protein and fiber.

Rich Source of Protein

Legumes provide more healthy protein per serving than other types of food. Beans, peas and lentils have about 15 grams of protein in a 1-cup serving. Women should get 46 grams of protein daily, while men need 56 grams every day, according to recommendations established by the Institute of Medicine. Based on these guidelines, a 1-cup serving of legumes supplies 33 percent of women’s and 27 percent of men’s daily protein.

Fiber for Heart and Digestive Health

Legumes are at the top of the list for sources of fiber. The insoluble fiber they contain prevents constipation. They also have soluble fiber, which helps keep blood sugar balanced and lowers the amount of cholesterol in your bloodstream. Fiber’s ability to prevent cardiovascular disease is so important that the Institute of Medicine determined the recommended intake – 25 grams daily for women and 38 grams daily for men – based on the amount needed to protect against coronary heart disease. The fiber in legumes varies slightly, but most varieties provide about 16 grams in a 1-cup serving.

There are several different health benefits associated with the regular consumption of legumes. Some of them:

  • Reduction of cholesterol levels in the blood
  • Regulating the levels of blood glucose for diabetics
  • Preventing cancer and reducing its risks
  • Lowering blood pressure
  • Improving the function of the colon
  • Curing constipation, piles and other digestive related problems

The benefits of eating sprouted legumes apply not just to adults, but also children. Many people avoid eating this food type, mainly because they are not aware of the various legumes health benefits. Moreover, if cooked incorrectly, some legumes can be quite bland and tasteless. Fortunately most legumes are quite versatile, which is why they can be added to any dish, ranging from salads to soups. Many innovative parents also increase the nutritional value of dishes such as pizzas and pastas, by adding legumes to them.

Benefits of Legumes For Women

Studies show that women who eat legumes, like soy bean, regularly, are less likely to develop breast cancer in comparison to others. Moreover, most legume varieties are high in iron. They boost the iron stores in women who are menstruating & may be at a risk for iron deficiency.

There are several health benefits that have been associated with legume.

Legumes Nutrition Facts

Most health experts advise people to include a fair amount of legumes in their diet, mainly because this food type is high in several important nutrients.

  • Most legumes, like lentils and beans are high in selenium, zinc, phosphorus, calcium, potassium and folate.
  • Certain varieties of beans, like soy bean, are packed with an anti-inflammatory compound known as saponins. This compound lowers the cholesterol levels, boosts the immune system and protects the body against cancer. However, cooking beans excessively destroys the saponins present in them.
  • For those who are vegan, legumes are one of the best forms of protein (not the only though, protein comes in many plant forms! ). Unlike meat, most legumes are low in cholesterol and fat, which is why they are much healthier in comparison.
  • The flavonoid content in some beans like garbanzo, work as healthy oestrogen and help relieve the symptoms of menopause in women
  • There is a significant amount of fiber present in legumes, because of which they improve digestion. Other nutrients that are found in legumes include vitamins, iron, starch and lime.

The number of calories may vary from one type of legume to the other. Given below is the caloric count for some of the common types of legumes:

  • Garbanzo beans (4 ounces) – 75 ounces
  • Kidney beans (4 ounces) – 94 calories
  • Boiled black eyed peas (4 ounces) – 120 calories
  • Baked beans, sugar-free (4 ounces) – 125 calories
  • Cranberry beans (4 ounces) 170 calories
  • Adzuki beans, sweetened (4 ounces) – 270

There is a lot of additional legumes nutritional information easily available through various resources, like online websites. Please do search further!

Protein:

Though most of us are aware of the fact that legumes are good for health, many of us do not know the exact nutritional value of this food type. Most types of legumes contain 20% to 25% protein. The protein content in legume is therefore, almost twice as much as what is found in rice and wheat. Another advantage of consuming legumes on a regular basis is that the digestibility of the protein is also quite high.

Carbs:

Carbohydrates can be divided into two types, depending upon their chemical structure. Simple carbs, usually present in sugar, enter the bloodstream at a very fast pace and provide your body with instant energy. However, the energy boost provided by simple carbs is usually followed by a crash. Complex carbs take longer to enter the bloodstream, but they provide the body with a steady source of energy. Therefore, complex carbs are much better for your health, as they prevent weight gain or cardiovascular problems. Legumes are an excellent source of complex carbs, which is why they should be consumed on a daily basis.

Vitamins:

Beans are usually rich in water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins. Some of the vitamins that can be found in various legumes include Vitamin B1, Vitamin B6 and & K. Beans like pinto beans, black beans, kidney beans and lima beans can provide your body with more than 20% of the daily vitamin value per serving.

Fiber:

Legumes are high in dietary fiber, which cleanses the colon, as it passes through your digestive system. The regular intake of fiber can reduce any blockage in the digestive tract, thereby decreasing problems like bloating, constipation and nausea. The fiber content in legumes also lowers risks of colon cancer and unhealthy cholesterol levels in the body.

Diabetics:

People who are diabetic are advised to reduce their intake of sugar and other foods that contain simple carbs. However, even if you are diabetic, your body requires some amount of carbs, preferably complex carbs, in order to get energy. Therefore, doctors usually recommend an increase in the consumption of legumes for diabetics. This is because the fat content in legumes is relatively low, as compared to many other foods. Moreover, though legumes are quite high in carbs, they contain complex carbs.

Recent studies show that a higher legume intake leads to around 40% reduction in the risks of developing type-2 diabetes. However, patients who are at a risk, or are suffering from diabetes, should consult a vegan nutritionist for daily recommended portions, before adding carbs to their diet. Consuming an excessive amount of any food, including legumes, could be quite harmful.

Digestion:

In spite of the fact that most legumes are highly nutritious, many people avoid them, mainly because they are a bit difficult to digest and can lead to the formation of excess intestinal gas. Fortunately, there are ways in which legumes can be made more digestible. Before cooking raw beans, you need to soak them in water, preferably for a couple of hours. Some varieties of beans, like chickpeas and kidney beans, should be soaked overnight before they are cooked. This helps removing some of the gas-causing substances, after which they become easier to digest.

Several people regularly consume legumes for digestion, so that they build up their body’s ability to process them. In case you are planning to do so, make sure that you start off with small quantities.

Allergy:

A food allergy takes place when the immune system in your body mistakes a certain food as being harmful and tries to fight it off. Then begins a process in which antibodies are produced, along with certain chemicals. It is the chemicals in the body that usually trigger off the symptoms of allergy. Several people are allergic to different types of legumes like nuts and soybean. In such cases, most health experts advise people to strictly avoid legumes for allergy control purposes. However, there are several foods that contain peanuts, peanut oil and soy products. Therefore, those who suffer from allergic reactions towards legumes should read all labels carefully, before consuming any foods.

Breast Cancer:

Several women check with doctors if they should consume legumes for breast cancer prevention. While legumes are highly healthy and nutritious, they do not specifically fight off breast cancer. However, they can improve a woman’s overall health and wellbeing, thereby reducing the risks of breast cancer.

For those women who are undergoing chemotherapy as a part of cancer treatment, constipation and other digestive problems are quite common. The fiber present in beans is also helpful in relieving some of the harmful side effects of chemotherapy. However, women are usually advised to avoid eating large quantities of legumes.

Cholesterol:

You can reduce the levels of cholesterol in your body, by consuming legumes on a regular basis. However, some varieties of legumes are better for cholesterol-reduction, as compared to the others. Given below are some of the most helpful legumes for cholesterol control:

  • Black beans
  • Black eyed peas
  • Chickpeas
  • Lentils
  • Navy beans
  • Peas
  • Pinto beans
  • Soy bean
  • String bean

Legumes are a fantastic source of protein. Please do incorporate this wonderful healthy food source into your meal plan. Do have a variety in your vegan pantry, and always have some soaked, sprouted, ready, and prepared, on hand for your recipes!

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Healthy dog food.

Many people are surprised to learn that not only can dogs enjoy vibrant health on a vegan diet, but just like people, their physical condition actually improves as a result of eliminating animal products and bi-products from their meal plans.

By genus, dogs may be classified as carnivorous, but metabolically, they are actually omnivorous. This means that their nutritional requirements can be adequately met with a plant-based diet – as they can source or synthesize all the nutrients they require from plant foods with supplementation. This is wonderful news for many of us who are already vegan and feel completely out of our comfort zone  feeding our companion friends unhealthy torture and cruelty. It therefore makes perfect logical sense to transition them for health reasons mostly but also in order to decrease our carbon foot print on the planet.

If you have never considered this option or thought that it was not possible then we shall with confidence help you in the right direction.  We have spoken to many vegans who have already done so and their canines are in perfect health! There is no reason why you can’t make the switch for them. It is very easy to cut meat, eggs and dairy from his diet for health and ethical reasons. With the vegan diet enjoying a positive widespread exposure, it should come as little surprise that  ‘pet’ owners might want to project those ideals onto their canine companions.

The health hazards of commercial meat-based:

The health hazards of commercial meat-based pet foods are extensive, and difficult to avoid. They  include slaughterhouse waste products; 4-D meat (from dead, dying, diseased and disabled animals); old or spoiled supermarket meat; large numbers of rendered dogs and cats from animal shelters; old restaurant grease, complete with high concentrations of dangerous free radicals and trans fatty acids; damaged or spoiled fish, complete with dangerous levels of mercury, PCBs and other toxins; pathogenic bacteria, protozoa, viruses, fungi and prions, and their associated endotoxins and mycotoxins; hormone and antibiotic residues; and dangerous preservatives. The combined results are rendered so delicious to cats and dogs by the addition of ‘digest’ – a soup of partially dissolved chicken entrails – that more than 95% of companion animals subsist primarily on commercial meat-based diets.

Unsurprisingly, diseases described in the scientific literature following long-term maintenance of cats and dogs on commercial meat-based diets include kidney, liver, heart, neurologic, eye, muscoloskeletal and skin diseases, bleeding disorders, birth defects, immunocompromisation and infectious diseases. Degenerative diseases such as cancer, kidney, liver and heart failure are far more common than they should be, and  many are likely to be exacerbated or directly caused by the numerous hazardous ingredients of commercial meat-based cat and dog diets.

Vegetarian diets: a healthy alternative:

On the other hand, studies and numerous case reports have shown that nutritionally sound vegan companion animal diets appear to be associated with the following health benefits: increased overall health and vitality, decreased incidences of cancer, infections, hypothyroidism, ectoparasites (fleas, ticks, lice and mites), improved coat condition, allergy control and less irritations, less dandruff or excess shedding, weight control, arthritis regression, diabetes regression and cataract resolution, improvement in breath and no stinky poos, longer life, and a general positive boost to their immune systems.

Creating a balanced diet that makes up for the loss of animal protein with substitutions of beans, soy and, to a lesser extent, vegetables and grains is key!

Many dogs with food allergies, benefit switching to a vegan diet.  They also avoid taking in animal by-products from commercially produced dog food, including slaughterhouse waste products and rejects that wouldn’t be fit for human consumption. We’ve seen so much cancer and other degenerative diseases in dogs in recent years so it’s easy to suspect that pet food is a contributor.

For those who have embraced a vegan diet for their dogs,  say they have living and breathing proof that it works.  Their dogs are normal, healthy, energetic and rambunctious!

The important thing is that you put together a well balanced  diet following a few easy guidelines that have been tried and tested over the past 30 years or so.  Today it is absolutely possible to find a good quality commercial vegan dog food from a reputable vegan supplier that doesn’t have animal products in it. Please check that they have gone through proper feed control trials. If you have the time and prefer to cook meals from scratch to save on costs, it is easy to do so, once again on advice from tried and tested recipes that offer all the nutrients and a good balance of essentials needed (this is much easier than you think).  We shall show you how.

You can now find all the vegan alternatives and you are able to produce nutritionally-balanced food for both cats and dogs.

Putting Together a Basic Meal:

At least a third to a half of your dog’s meal should consist of a quality protein source. The remaining portion can be made up of a variety of whole grains, raw and cooked vegetables, as well as certain supplemental items.  (please refer some of our suggested listing below).

The Vegan Dog Nutrition Association recommends that the base of the meal be comprised of soybeans, lentils, rice, oats and sweet potatoes. Pinto beans are the most non-allergenic food for vegan dogs, and (along with sweet potatoes and carrots),  they provide a good basis for their diet. Pinto beans and sweet potatoes can also be used exclusively for up to 6 to 8 weeks to determine whether your dog is suffering from food allergies.

Note: All legumes should be well-cooked (until very soft) and preferably mashed or puréed in a food processor.

Adding a sprinkling of sea vegetable flakes such as kelp or dulse helps to ensure a dietary source of minerals.

Dogs can enjoy fruit in small amounts  if they will eat it. Our dogs enjoy a variety of fruits, ranging from bananas, apples and orange, to watermelon! Just make sure that you don’t feed your dog fruit too close to a high-protein meal. The enzymes are different and can cause digestive discomfort.

Protein & Carbohydrates:

A dog’s protein requirement need is higher than ours. To ensure that your dog gets enough, make sure that approximately a third to a half of their meal consists of a high-quality protein source (such as well-cooked legumes – pintos, chick peas, soy beans, lentils, sprouted lentils, garbanzo beans, and split peas, tofu,  and tempeh (are all good).

Unless your dog requires a grain-free diet for health reasons, well-cooked whole grains are good sources of both protein and carbohydrates, as well as other nutrients such as B vitamins. We’ve found that whole grains in moderation work really well for our dogs, including brown rice, quinoa, millet, polenta (corn grits) or blended fresh corn kernels, oats, barley, and buckwheat.

Seitan (wheat-meat) is a high-protein vegan ‘meat’ made from gluten flour. Dogs absolutely love it, and (just like with humans) seitan can be a great help when ‘veganizing’ a formerly carnivorous dog. But since wheat gluten should not be consumed to excess, seitan ought to remain just an occasional treat for dogs as they are not very healthy to eat on a regular basis.

Enzymes & Beta-carotene:

Sweet potatoes, carrots and other orange-colored root vegetables are important sources of beta-carotene, and should be included on a regular basis (cut finely and/or mashed). Regular potatoes (in small pieces or mashed) are also fine to include on occasion, but they do not include this important nutrient. Dogs convert beta-carotene into Vitamin A, which is a necessary nutrient that is hard for them to get elsewhere in a plant-based diet.

Other vegetables (also cut finely and/or mashed) are good to include whenever possible, for the vitamins, minerals, enzymes and fiber. The best choices are pumpkin, squash, yams, carrots, and also other small bits of broccoli, brussels sprouts, cooked cabbage, etc. Raw, grated carrot and/or beetroot is good, as well as sprouts, and/or raw, dark leafy greens, finely chopped and mixed in well with their meals.

Some authorities recommend adding digestive enzymes to a dog’s diet, though this is not something we’ve had reason to be concerned about. The company Harbingers of a New Age sells a product called Prozyme; a supplement for dogs that contains all of the enzymes they require.

There are also some excellent supplements available for dogs, cats and other companion animals that are made from dark green leafy vegetables and other highly nutritious plant foods. One such product (which also happens to contain all the essential digestive enzymes as well as a comprehensive probiotic mixture) is called Green Mush, produced by Health Force Nutritionals. Green Mush is a whole food, green plant based powder, that includes large amounts of CoQ10, which is a powerful antioxidant involved in energy production and longevity. The owners of Health Force state that the product can be helpful for dogs, cats, rabbits, rats, guinea pigs, hamsters, mice, ferrets, squirrels, other mammals and human animals too! Health Force Nutritionals is an excellent resource for both human and nonhuman nutritional needs.

Taurine, L-Carnitine & B12:

Vegetarian dog specialists and most companies that sell vegan dog food advise adding taurine and L-carnitine to the diets of vegan dogs. These are two amino acids that are naturally found in animal flesh, but do not naturally occur in plants. Dogs cannot synthesize these nutrients themselves. Deficiencies can be potentially serious, so a supplement is an important preventative measure. Both of these nutrients can be bought at your local health food store, and they are also included in many commercial vegan dog products.

Another supplement that we have included in our dogs’ diets is nutritional yeast; either Red Star Vegetarian Support Formula or Lotus Brands – both of which are rich in B vitamins, and are fortified with Vitamin B12. Whether or not you include nutritional yeast in your dog’s food, you should make sure that they receive an adequate source of B12.

Note:  Harbingers of a New Age provides a supplement called ‘VegeDog’, which provides two of these: Vitamin B12 and taurine. One month’s supply of this fantastic product costs just $12.00. That’s only 40 cents per day to make sure that your dog is getting these important nutrients, as well as other essential vitamins and minerals.

Oils & Essential Fatty Acids:

Dogs need a certain amount of oil in their diets, and if they’re lacking it, their coat will be a clear sign. A lusterless coat can transform after a few days of including a nutritious oil in the diet, such as flax. A dog’s oil requirements can also be met with 1-2 tablespoons of tahini (sesame seed butter), flax seed oil, hemp seed oil, or ground flax seeds, coconut oil is great too.  A teaspoon or two of organic sunflower, olive, or coconut oil poured over their food will get them to eat anything! Flax and hemp have the added benefit of being Omega-rich.

There are many studies that confirm the powerful healing benefits of giving dogs flax seed oil or another fatty acid blend. To ensure your dogs are receiving the necessary essential fatty acids (omegas 3, 6, & 9), add 1 teaspoon to 1 tablespoon of vegan essential fatty acid oil.  Flax seed oil, hemp seed oil, or 1 teaspoon of ground or soaked flax seeds. (This is beneficial for vegan humans as well). ‘Total EFA’ oil also serves other purposes such as helping joint function and coat health. These oils are especially important for senior dogs.

Vega EFA Oil Blend is made from a combination of antioxidant and phytonutrient rich seed oils including green tea seed oil and blueberry seed oil. Deva and V-Pure are now producing vegan DHA, long chain fatty-acids from seaweed in a capsule for humans, which you can share with your companion animals.

Cranimals organic supplements contain vegan EFAs like DHA and ALA, as well as beta-carotene and a host of other valuable phytonutrients (urinary tract, dental and heart healthy antioxidants from berry extracts and vitamins and minerals from organic spirulina). The powdered and liquid Cranimals supplements for dogs and cats, as well as their Zendog biscuits, supply EFAs from algae, flax and cranberries.

Conclusion:

Being a responsible guardian for any animal means making an effort to ensure that his or her diet is nutritionally complete, just as you would for yourself. The best thing you can do for your animal friends is to continue to keep yourself informed, as  new research being released all the time.

Go  organic where you can.

Quality protein source:

Beans/legumes

Garbanzo beans (cooked, ground/blended).

Pinto beans are the most non-allergenic food for vegan dogs

Lentils (cooked, mashed and or processed)

Sprouted lentils

Chick peas

Split peas (cooked, mashed and or processed)

Chia seeds

Soy

Soybean

Sprouts

Tempeh

Tofu

TVP (textured vegetable protein)

Variety of whole grains:

Brown rice

Oats

Quinoa

Millet

Polenta

Barley

Buckwheat

Vegetables raw and cooked:

Orange-colored root vegetables are important sources of beta-carotene

Carrots

Pumpkin

Squash

Yams

Sweet potatoes

Broccoli

Brussels sprouts

Cabbage cooked

Sprouts

Dark leafy greens (raw and cooked = calcium and iron supplementation)

Supplemental items:

Taurine

Niacin

L Carnitine

Glutamene

Ground flax

Amino acids

Essential fatty acids

Nutritional yeast (great source of  B12)

Sea vegetable flakes such as kelp or dulse helps to ensure a dietary source of minerals

Seaweed

Oils:

Flax seed oil

Hemp seed oil

Coconut oil

Olive oil

Sunflower oil

Fruits:

Cranberries

Bananas

Apples

Orange

Watermelon

Herbs:  In small amounts and always check with your vegan vet

Ginger

Goldenseal

Milk Thistle

Valerian

Calendula

Basil

Hawthorn

Please share your successes with us in switching your canines to a healthy cruelty free diet and do help us update our page here for others to share. We would love to hear from you! Are your dogs vegan yet? Have you stopped supporting the cruel factory farming industries, pet, zoo and other entertainment trades, as well as domestic breeding programmes? Do let us know!